Furúnculo Otherwise Known As Boil

This is one nasty boil with really slimy looking pus!

Furúnculo parte 1

Furúnculo parte 2

Thanks to YouTube’s Augusto440 for Furúnculo parte 1 and Furúnculo parte 2 posted on Jan 11 ’11.

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19 Comments on “Furúnculo Otherwise Known As Boil

  1. Actually that isn’t pus at all but something called “fibrin.” It is made my an enzyme in the blood and actually acts as a “plug” so that other bacteria can’t get in there. This is seen a lot in staph infections where the skin is open.
    The web address I found some good info was too long to post here and I couldn’t copy and paste the material (copyrighted). But the gist of it is what I just said. Good vids! I like thick stuff!

  2. Good video. Reminds me of a Robin (the bird, not the superhero sidekick)pulling a worm out of the ground. Thanks SD. And thanks PPM on the fibrin plug info. Makes sense to me.

  3. @pimplepoppinmama – why does the ‘fibrin’ form instead of a scab?

    doesn’t a scab perform the same function?

  4. Needs debridement something fierce! Anyone else thinking MRSA/VRSA?

  5. General overview of our old friend here at PTZ S. aureus & how it relates to fibrin plugs.

  6. Good find sd!!! Pull the plug man!

    1. Yep, really like to see pus plugs or fibrins being pulled out. They look small until the pulling starts and they are long and/or wide.

  7. @ PPM & Bogey as far as I remember Fibrin is an insoluble protein that is produced in veinns & artteries in response to bleeding, and is the major component of a blood clot.
    I used to teach Anatomy & Physiology, and remember this bit of info.
    I think that the “plug” which is being pulled out is in fact pus, which is a result of the over production of white blood cells gathered to fight infection.
    The scab would form on the outside of the body to protect further infection on the inside of the skin. Once the pus “plug” is removed and the infected hole is cleared up a bit a scab will form over the hole to protect further infection.
    There … my 2 cents worth.
    Anyone with any other medical background wish to weigh in on this …?

  8. NicDinecola says:

    cool vids.. Thanks Emil for getting one of my favorite sites running smoothly again, I hope you don’t have anymore trouble with hackers or whatever it was. Thanks

  9. In an old video on YT this kid said that stuff was called fibrin by the people in the hospital. Then I looked up “fibrin.” If you look up ‘fibrin in a boil,’ I think you’ll see what I am talking about. This is directly from the book portion I read:
    Other enzymes such as coagulase, a distinguishing feature of Staphlococous(sp) Aureus, is a cell-associated and diffusable enzyme converting fibrinogen to fibrin, promoting clotting. It’s virulence potential is controversial: it may be that a staphlococaal lesion encased in fibrin (e.g. boil or pimple)could make the organism less accessible to phagocytes or antimicrobial agents.

    whew… now to me this sounded like the fibrin forms to keep things out of a staph wound. I don’t know what it all means for certain but that is what I found. This excerpt is from the book “Infectious disease: pathogenesis, prevention, and case studies” by Nandini Shetty, Julian W. Tang, Julie Andrews
    Just my opinion from observations and this article. I thought scabs were formed mainly of blood. Boils are different aren’t they? I’m sure not an educated person like you Puss n Boots, this is just what I think! Thanks for the input both of you, bogey1 and Puss.

  10. @ PPM thanks for the research lady! Wow I have never heard of Fibrin in a boil.
    I love comming to this site & learning really interesting things!
    And just to say … just cause your educated dear lady don’t mean your smart, which clearly you are! :)

  11. ThatSmellsLikeAss says:

    ok, fibrin is also called factor la. it’s a fibrous protein (non-globular) involved in the clotting of blood. it’s also invlovled with signal transduction, blood coagulation, platelet activation, and protein polymerization. excessive generation of fibrin leads to thrombosis ( a clot). ineffective generation predisposes a person to hemorrhage. reduced, absent, or dysfunctional fibrin is likely to result in hemophilia. abnormalities of fibrinogen can be hereditary.

  12. Thanks to whoever fixed my favorite site..
    My 2 cents worth that was a pus plug and he should see his doctor. Looks like MRSA!

  13. popitlikeitshot says:

    Hey, as far as I am concerned; if it is a natural substance coming out of a naturally formed hole on an otherwise holeless place on the body….I’m good…

  14. faerlyn_darkelf says:

    I KNEW there were a lot of medical people and frustrated wanna-be medical people (me!) on this site!! I just love reading the medical reasoning, answers a lot of my questions right in the comments! glad the site is back, I missed it!

  15. Wow, I just thought he was slowly pulling on a pus-covered ingrown hair (to make a better video) that caused a boil. Hell if I know.
    Thanks everybody for the info. Learn something new every day! Now if I can just remember it . . .
    SD

  16. Jen_the_ledge says:

    any wonder there is a sore….. fingernails ??? eeeeewwwww great vid !!!

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